Diverse Logotypes

 

Diverse Logotypes
 
Diverse Logotypes
 
Diverse Logotypes
Along the years I have designed many logotypes. Here you can see a compilation of the most of them.  All of them have been developed as lettering projects, in close collaboration with the art directors and graphic designers that are in front of the project. We normally talk a lot about the assignment before I start to sketch, is the best way to narrow down the options, talking about typographic styles can be very tricky as we may have different backgrounds. In those previous talks, the most of the doubts are solved.
The design process
For lettering work, I always start with calligraphic sketches, done with specific tools or just with pencil, those are being sent to the client for approval. In my work for advertising, I learned that the most finished sketch is the best, as the clients are not so used to interpret and understand letterforms. Once is approved I work in a more refined one, that is the one that I will use as the basis for digitization, or the translation from paper to screen. In this process of redrawing by vectors, I correct some mistakes as I go. Normally I prefer to use font editors programmes (FontLab, Glyphs, Robofont) rather than Illustrator. I use a Wacom tablet and almost exclusively the pen tool. Depending on the style  I work on a skeleton, that can be expanded later, or straight on the contours. Once I have some satisfying sketches I print in different sizes and send them to the client for feedback. 
Along the years I have designed many logotypes. Here you can see a compilation of the most of them.  All of them have been developed as lettering projects, in close collaboration with the art directors and graphic designers that are in front of the project. We normally talk a lot about the assignment before I start to sketch, is the best way to narrow down the options, talking about typographic styles can be very tricky as we may have different backgrounds. In those previous talks, the most of the doubts are solved.
The design process
For lettering work, I always start with calligraphic sketches, done with specific tools or just with pencil, those are being sent to the client for approval. In my work for advertising, I learned that the most finished sketch is the best, as the clients are not so used to interpret and understand letterforms. Once is approved I work in a more refined one, that is the one that I will use as the basis for digitization, or the translation from paper to screen. In this process of redrawing by vectors, I correct some mistakes as I go. Normally I prefer to use font editors programmes (FontLab, Glyphs, Robofont) rather than Illustrator. I use a Wacom tablet and almost exclusively the pen tool. Depending on the style  I work on a skeleton, that can be expanded later, or straight on the contours. Once I have some satisfying sketches I print in different sizes and send them to the client for feedback. 
Along the years I have designed many logotypes. Here you can see a compilation of the most of them.  All of them have been developed as lettering projects, in close collaboration with the art directors and graphic designers that are in front of the project. We normally talk a lot about the assignment before I start to sketch, is the best way to narrow down the options, talking about typographic styles can be very tricky as we may have different backgrounds. In those previous talks, the most of the doubts are solved.
The design process
For lettering work, I always start with calligraphic sketches, done with specific tools or just with pencil, those are being sent to the client for approval. In my work for advertising, I learned that the most finished sketch is the best, as the clients are not so used to interpret and understand letterforms. Once is approved I work in a more refined one, that is the one that I will use as the basis for digitization, or the translation from paper to screen. In this process of redrawing by vectors, I correct some mistakes as I go. Normally I prefer to use font editors programmes (FontLab, Glyphs, Robofont) rather than Illustrator. I use a Wacom tablet and almost exclusively the pen tool. Depending on the style  I work on a skeleton, that can be expanded later, or straight on the contours. Once I have some satisfying sketches I print in different sizes and send them to the client for feedback. 
ManyLogos